Accommodations and Accessibility

The Minnesota Court of Appeals recently held that the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA) does not require an employer to engage in an interactive process with an employee to determine whether an appropriate reasonable accommodation is necessary.
In McBee v. Team Industries, Inc., the plaintiff, a machine operator, received medical attention for back and

As previously reported, a national trend seen here in Minnesota involves public accommodations receiving letters from attorneys threating costly litigation alleging non-compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA) regarding proper accessibility for the disabled.  These demands typically offer to settle the matter for amounts far less

Yes – the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals recently held that a police department made an objectively reasonable decision that an officer posed a direct threat and, therefore, was not qualified to do his job under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), based in part on the officer’s bizarre behavior.
In Michael v. City

In a recent Statement of Regulatory Priorities, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it does not expect to publish regulations regarding website accessibility for places of public accommodation under Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) until 2018. That is only eight years after the DOJ first solicited public comments

Legislation is under consideration at both the federal and the state level to address a dramatic increase in litigation against places of public accommodation alleging violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA). Many have questioned whether the motive underlying these lawsuits is a legitimate interest in

The University of Minnesota recently published a study reporting that only 40% of working mothers were provided with adequate break time and a clean, private space for expressing milk upon their return to work from parenting leave. To help employers avoid liability for failing to comply with applicable legal requirements relating to nursing mothers, here

No – the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals recently rejected a failure-to-accommodate claim brought by an employee who worked without accommodation for two years after he requested and then retracted his request for accommodation.
In Aldini v. Kroger Co. of Michigan, the employee initially requested a lifting restriction of no more than 25