On March 7, 2019, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced a proposed rule to raise salary requirements for overtime exemptions for executive, administrative, and professional employees. Currently, the salary threshold for exempt employees is $455 per week, or $23,660 annually. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employees below this salary threshold must be paid

A “Pre-emption” or a uniform labor standards bill is a reaction in the Minnesota Legislature to the passage of sick time ordinances in Minneapolis and St. Paul. The idea is that Minnesota Employers’ obligations to employees regarding time-off and other similar obligations should be the same state-wide out of principles of fairness in competition and

Moving beyond earned sick leave and safe time ordinances, it is very likely that this year the Minneapolis and St. Paul City Councils will take on the possibility of a $15 minimum wage ordinance. Such a municipal minimum wage exceeds state ($7.75 for small employers and $9.50 for large employers) and federal ($7.25) minimum wage,

Minnesota Employers operating in the East Metro need to be aware of the impending deadlines in the St. Paul Earned Sick and Safe Time Ordinance (“ESST”) which requires employers with St. Paul-based employees to provide paid sick leave and safe time to those employees. For employers with 24 or more full or part-time St. Paul

The new Department of Labor (DOL) overtime regulations increasing the minimum salary threshold for white collar exemptions to an annualized $47,476 were set to become effective December 1, 2016. However, on November 22, 2016, a Texas Federal District Court issued a nationwide preliminary injunction blocking the new rules from becoming effective.
The DOL has now

Employees who believe they have been improperly denied payment of wages or commissions owed when separated from employment may make a claim against their employer seeking full payment. Particular statutory provisions apply depending on whether the employee was terminated or voluntarily resigned.
In either situation, the employee may be entitled to a penalty payment,

On October 27, 2016, the Internal Revenue Service announced the 2017 cost-of-living adjusted amounts for certain retirement plan and fringe benefit limitations. Earlier in 2016, the Internal Revenue Service announced the 2017 cost-of-living adjustments affecting health savings accounts and high deductible health plans, and on October 18, 2016, the Social Security Administration announced the

All Minnesota Employers are statutorily obligated to provide employees, “the right to be absent from work for the time necessary to appear at the employee’s polling place, cast a ballot and return to work” without a pay or PTO deduction or any direct or indirect interference.  Minn. Stat. §204C.04. This applies to any time of

On October 21, 2015, the Internal Revenue Service announced the 2016 cost-of-living adjusted amounts for certain retirement plan and fringe benefit limitations. Earlier in 2015, the Internal Revenue Service announced the 2016 cost-of-living adjustments affecting health savings accounts and high deductible health plans, and on October 15, 2015, the Social Security Administration announced the