The NFL’s 2014 punishment of Adrian Peterson has been a rollercoaster ride.  After a district court vacated the punishment, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals has now reinstated it.
The NFL suspended Peterson and fined him the equivalent of six games worth of pay after he entered a plea of no contest in November 2014

When an employer purchases another company or facility with a workforce covered by a collective bargaining agreement, it should pay careful attention to whether it is either a “successor employer” or a “perfectly clear successor employer” under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  Here’s what employers need to know about these two different statuses:
Successor

There are four problematic behaviors, which employers should avoid to stay in compliance with the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  These behaviors are commonly abbreviated as T.I.P.S. and consist of the following:

  • Threats: Employers may violate the NLRA if they make threats against employees who support unions or unionization efforts.  Impermissible threats may take a

The 7th Circuit recently disagreed with other federal courts of appeals and sided with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) by holding that class-waiver provisions in arbitration agreements violate the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  The ruling creates a circuit split that can only be resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court.
Whether arbitration agreements

A recent case involving Whole Foods demonstrates the ever-increasing importance to the National Labor and Relations Board of protecting Section 7 concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act.  Section 7 protects activities of employees when exercising their rights under the National Labor Relations Act to collective action.  Both unionized and non-unionized employees are protected

In a recent 3-2 decision, the NLRB changed the prevailing joint employer standard under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) in a way that has profound implications for franchisors and employers who utilize subcontracted labor. The NLRB General Counsel first signaled its intent to change the joint employer standard last year, when it issued numerous

The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals recently reversed a decision by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), which held that an employer acted unlawfully by firing an employee who threatened a co-worker.
In Nichols Aluminum LLC v. NLRB, the employer fired an employee for making a threat to a co-worker shortly after the

No – a federal appeals court recently rejected the argument that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) protects an employee who wears a shirt that says “inmate” or “prisoner” while working.
In Southern New England Telephone Co. v. NLRB, the court addressed the issue of whether an employer could prohibit employees who entered customers’

Yes – according to an administrative law judge for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), racist and profane comments made during union picketing qualify as protected concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).
In Cooper Tire & Rubber Co., the employer and the union reached impasse during collective bargaining, and the employer

Probably not – in a recent case, an administrative law judge (ALJ) for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rejected an employer’s argument that a savings clause added to the beginning of its employee handbook shielded the employer from liability.
The focus of the dispute in Macy’s, Inc. was whether the employer’s policies were unlawfully